Peace River and County of Northern Lights fire departments. Kneeling in the front row left-right, are Lt. Patrick Connellan, probationary firefighter Delarae Heon, Darien D’Orsay, Lt. Nolan Keddie and Bryn Keddie. Standing left-right, are Drew Keddie, Tim Berger, Jesse Kasouf, Cameron Jackson, engineer Cheryl Rogers, fire chief Tim Harris, Dale Shewchuk, Morgan Hayward, Kelly Laramore, Trevor Routledge, Capt. Mike Frayne, Travis Mitten and probationary firefighter Mark Owens. Missing in the photo are Capt. Mike Kinshella, Capt. Robin Differenz, Lt. James Martin, Matthew Bolduc, Devin Braun, Emily Differenz, Rhianna Differenz, chaplain Cornelio Esguerra, Keely Girard, Manuel Gomez, Jamie Green, William Halabisky, Kevin Labrie, Tristan Sanchuck, Graham Smyth and Sabbir Zahed.

The Peace River and County of Northern Lights fire departments are teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to promote Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 3-9.
“Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety” is the theme of the week.to educate everyone about simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.
“What do the sounds mean?” says Lorraine Carli, vice-president of outreach and advocacy at NFPA.
“Is there a beep or a chirp coming out of your smoke or carbon monoxide alarm?
“Knowing the difference can save you, your home, and your family.”
The fire departments encourage all residents to embrace the 2021 Fire Prevention Week theme. “It’s important to learn the different sounds of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms,” fire chief Tim Harris says.
“When an alarm makes noise, a beeping sound or a chirping sound, you must take action.
“Make sure everyone in the home understands the sounds of the alarms and knows how to respond. “To learn the sounds of your specific smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, check the manufacturer’s instructions that came in the box, or search the brand and model online.”
The Peace River and County of Northern Lights Fire Departments want to share some safety tips to help you “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety”.
-A continuous set of three loud beeps—beep, beep, beep—means smoke or fire. Get out, call 9-1-1, and stay out.
-A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed.
-All smoke alarms must be replaced after 10 years.
-Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.
-Make sure your smoke and CO alarms meet the needs of all your family members, including those with sensory or physical disabilities.
Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, the Peace River and County of Northern Lights fire departments will not be hosting any open houses for Fire Prevention Week this year but will be reaching out to the community through public messaging on radio and social media.
The departments have seen an average number of calls so far this year at 175 to date.
“While responses to monitored fire and smoke alarms account for the highest number of calls attended, at 67, the greatest number of personnel hours for responses is, by far, structure fires and wildland fires at 382 and 244 hours respectively,” Harris says.
The Peace River and County of Northern Lights dire departments have 34 members in total, located at two halls in Peace River and two in the County of Northern Lights in Weberville and Dixonville. “We are always looking for new recruits to assist the departments in serving the communities needs” Harris says.
Anyone interested in applying or looking for more information can phone the fire department at (780) 624-2993.
While the minimum age to respond to incidents is 18 years, the departments also operate a junior firefighter program for youth aged 16 to 17 years.
To find out more about local Fire Prevention Week programs or enquiries regarding recruitment, please contact the Peace River and County of Northern Lights Fire Departments at (780) 624-2993 or email: prfd@peaceriver.ca.
For more general information about Fire Prevention Week and fire prevention in general, visit the online website at www.fpw.org.